SOUTHEAST TORNADOES 2019

 UPDATED THURSDAY,  MAY 9, 2019 10:38 AM EST

Matthew 25: Ministries responded to deadly tornadoes that swept through Alabama and Georgia on Sunday, March 3.  The tornadoes produced massive damage across a large area approximately 1 mile wide and 30 miles long.

The powerful tornadoes that tore through Lee County in Alabama killed at least 23 people and left a path of destruction that looked “as if someone had taken a blade and just scraped the ground,” said the Lee County Sheriff. These storms marked the deadliest day for tornadoes in Alabama since the Tuscaloosa-Birmingham tornado in 2011.

Matthew 25: Ministries’ Disaster Response Team departed on Tuesday, March 5 for Alabama and Georgia with a selection of Matthew 25’s Disaster Response vehicles loaded with supplies. The team distributed aid to affected communities and met with partners to discuss long-term distribution opportunities. In total, our on-the-ground team distributed approximately 800 personal care kits, 25 first-aid and safety kits, 6,800 rolls of paper products, 1,000 detergent pod samples, 220 cases of diapers, 320 bottles of all-purpose cleaner, 380 pairs of work gloves, 250 packs of batteries, 25 generators, 40 blower fans, 25 rolls of garbage bags, and 70 tarps.

Matthew 25 also shipped a semi of aid to partners in the affected area. The shipment contained nearly 15,000 pounds of products, including personal care items, paper towels, toilet paper, facial tissues, diapers and batteries.

Matthew 25: Ministries accepts cash, credit card and online donations for ongoing disaster aid and humanitarian relief programs.

Donors who would like to designate their financial gifts for Tornado Relief may do so by writing “Southeast Tornadoes” in the memo line of their check or by typing it in the “in honor of” field of our online giving form.  Please mail checks to Matthew 25: Ministries, 11060 Kenwood Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242.  100% of donated funds designated for Southeast Tornadoes will be used for the purpose intended.
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